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Hampton Roads History Lectures

Join us for a FREE virtual Lecture

Select Fridays at 12 p.m. (EST)

Take a look back in history as John V. Quarstein, noted historian, author, and director emeritus of USS Monitor Center, along with special guest speakers, share significant events about our nation’s history and examine their direct ties to the Hampton Roads region.

Lectures are FREE, and hosted through Zoom. Advance registration is required to submit questions or comments to the presenter.

Books by featured authors may be purchased online, and we invite you to support the Museum when you shop Amazon. Go to smile.amazon.com and choose The Mariners’ Museum as your charity of choice. Thank you for your support!

Got ideas for a lecture topic or want to share comments or questions? Email us at lectureseries@marinersmuseum.org.


Upcoming lectures:


The Life and Tryals of the Gentleman Pirate Major Stede Bonnet

January 29, 2021 • 12 p.m. (EST) 

Presented by Jeremy R. Moss, author and historian

About the lecture:
Chesapeake native Jeremy R. Moss is an accomplished lawyer and lobbyist in Alexandria, Virginia. An emerging author and freelance historian, Moss’s research and writing are focused on piracy and early colonial maritime history. His book,
The Life and Tryals of the Gentleman Pirate Major Stede Bonnet, brings to life the golden age of piracy. Awash with myth-busting history, Moss tells the story of the real pirates of the Caribbean, sharing accounts of daily life, social issues, natural disasters, political intrigues, bloody battles; and, of course, buried treasure, walking the plank, flying the Jolly Roger, pirate-speak and more, all while weaving in interesting connections to the history of Hampton Roads.

Viewers are welcome to send him any comments or questions during the presentation, and Mr. Moss will answer them following his talk.



PURCHASE your copy of Moss’s book on AmazonSmile today!
We invite you to support the Museum when you shop Amazon. Go to smile.amazon.com and choose The Mariners’ Museum as your charity of choice. Thank you!

World War I: Hampton Roads Port of Embarkation

February 12, 2021 • 12 p.m. (EST) 

Presented by John V. Quarstein, noted author, historian and director emeritus of the USS Monitor Center

About the lecture:
Bays, rivers, and creeks were key transportation elements for the economic growth of Tidewater Virginia. As Virginia expanded westward, a man-made waterway, like those in use in England and Holland, was needed to facilitate movement of people and supplies. George Washington became one of the greatest advocates for the Commonwealth’s canal development. The first transportation canal in the United States was the Dismal Swamp Canal. Washington saw the need to connect eastern North Carolina, which did not have a deep water port, to the Chesapeake Bay. He surveyed the route himself, recognizing the need to connect the Ohio River Valley with Eastern Virginia. The general knew that whichever state first made that connection would become an economic powerhouse. While the Chesapeake & Ohio and the James River & Kanawha canals were efforts to achieve this goal, they were underfunded and were unable to cross the Allegheny Mountains to make that connection. Instead, New York underwrote the canal construction which was able to use the Mohawk River Valley to reach Lake Erie, allowing New York City to become the leading port on the East Coast.

 Viewers are welcome to send him any comments or questions during the presentation, and John will answer them following his talk.


Image credit: Lake Drummond Hotel, The Gretna Green of Lower Virginia. Lithograph print, 1831. Pendleton Lithography, lithographer, Boston; C. Hall, publisher. The Mariners’ Museum 1941.0406.000001.

Programming Video Archives:

Great news! You can access any of the live lectures, programs and workshops missed, and view at your convenience. We hope you learn something new while watching these videos!

 

 

Header image: Hampton Roads, Virginia, from official state map published in 1859. Public Domain.